David Green
Invited Talk - 13th April 2018 - 11am Chichester 3 Building, Room: 3R143
Talk by David Green on "Representing Realities in Virtual Reality.".

More information

Close

Abstract

I will begin with a short introduction to the Bristol VR Lab. I will share some insights from the early stages of the 'Virtual Realities: Immersive Documentary Encounters' project (October 2017), drawing on my previous research into interaction design for non-fiction (2011-2016). This will include observations from two exploratory activities - a database of non-fiction VR works (2012-2017) [w/ Chris Bevan] and a survey of award-winning VR producers [w/ Mandy Rose]. Given that we are still in the early stages of the (2.5 year) project, I will focus on our emerging research questions, with an invitation to feedback, ask questions and discuss.

Short Bio

David Green is a Research Fellow at the University of the West of England, based at Bristol VR (Virtual Reality) Lab. A documentary-maker and computer scientist, his PhD (at Open Lab Newcastle University) focused on interaction design for participation in interactive documentaries. After postdocs at Newcastle and Northumbria Universities, he is now working on the EPSRC-funded 'Virtual Realities: Immersive Documentary Encounters' project, which is taking a highly interdisciplinary approach to exploring immersive forms of non-fiction (e.g. journalism and documentary).

Dr Oussama Metatla
Invited Talk - 24th November 2017 - 11am Arundel Building, Room: 1A
Talk by Dr Oussama Metatla on "Designing multisensory technology with and for people living with visual impairments".

More information

Close

Abstract

Involving people in the process of designing technology that affects them is now a well established component of HCI research and practice. However, as with many forms of participation in decision-making in society, people living with visual impairments have had more limited opportunities to influence technology design across a variety of domains. A number of factors contribute to this; for example, many participatory design methods often rely on visual techniques, such as post-it notes and low-fi paper prototyping, to facilitate the expression and communication of design ideas; and while using visual means to express ideas for designing graphical interfaces is appropriate, it is harder to use them to articulate the design of, say, sonic or haptic artefacts, which are typical alternative modalities of interaction for people living with visual impairments. In this talk, I will outline our experience of engaging with people living with visual impairments and people with mixed visual abilities, where we adapted participatory design methods in order to jointly create meaningful technology, and describe some resulting research investigations that such engagement opened up in the areas of multisensory and crossmodal interaction design.

Short Bio

Oussama Metatla is an EPSRC Research Fellow at the Department of Computer Science, University of Bristol, where he currently leads a project researching inclusive educational technology for children with mixed visual abilities in mainstream schools. His research interests include investigating multisensory user experiences with interactive technology and designing with and for people living with visual impairments. He received his PhD in 2011 from Queen Mary University of London for a thesis exploring and characterising the use of sound to support non-visual interaction. Following this, he was a Researcher Co-Investigator on two EPSRC projects Crossmodal Collaborative Interfaces and Design Patterns for Inclusive Collaboration, also at QMUL, and an Associate Lecturer at Oxford Brookes University before being awarded an EPSRC Early Career Fellowship, hosted at the University of Bristol.

Angelique-Montuwy
Invited Talk - 5th July 2017 - 1pm Arundel Building, Room: 223
Talk by Angélique Montuwy on "Visual, Auditory and Haptic guidance feedback for older pedestrians: efficiency and user experience".

More information

Close

Abstract

This talk will focus on my PhD that deals with visual, auditory and haptic feedback to guide older pedestrians in the city. I evaluate the effectiveness and user experience of turn-by-turn information provided through AR glasses, bone conduction earphones and a vibrotactile wristband. However, I am interested in all sensory modalities and interaction modes that could be used to guide a pedestrian.

Short Bio

Angelique is a PhD student in Human Factors at Telecom ParisTech (Paris, France). She is interested in sensory modalities used to provide navigation information to older pedestrians via mobile and/or wearable devices. She has studied Computer Sciences and Digital Culture at University of Rennes and has previous working experiences in designing websites, apps and learning contents.

feelies
Invited talk - 7th June 2017 - 1:00pm Arundel, Room 219 (GTS Seminar Room)
Talk by Prof. Guy Gratton on "Cockpit ergonomics – the problems and the research".

More information

Close

Abstract

In this talk, Guy will explain some of the basic problems that exist in ensuring that human beings can function effectively in aircraft cockpits, including some of his own research in see-and-avoid and handling characteristics – and where he sees the worthwhile problems for future research in aircraft ergonomics.

Short Bio

Guy Gratton is Head of Airborne Science and Technology to the National Centre for Atmospheric Science, and a visiting Professor at Cranfield University. Prior to that he has been Head of the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements, a lecturer at Brunel University, Chief Technical Officer to the British Microlight Aircraft Association, and an aircraft Trials Officer for the Ministry of Defence. He is a Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society, and an Associate Fellow of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots; his team’s work on departures from controlled flight won the 2014 RAeS Bronze award and his PhD work won him the SETP “Salmon” award in 2003 as well as the IMechE’s Astridge Prize for Aerospace Safety, and Safety in Mechanical Award the same year.

Regina
Invited Talk - 9th November 2016 - 11am Arundel Building, Room: 223
Talk by Regina Bernhaupt on "Engineering User Experience".

More information

Close

Abstract

User Experience has become a buzzword in the last decade being used in academia and industry alike to describe a presumably new way to design for better experiences for people using interactive software and system. But the way from a fancy and novel way of interaction with a system or a more immersive experience to a final product on the market is a long one. This talk presents a case study from industry describing how a first idea for a new experience is iterated, changed and enhanced to make it finally into the market. Based on this case study a theoretical framework is presented that shows how during a user-centered design and development process a variety of methods and approaches have to be combined to enable not only to design, but to engineer for user experience.

Short Bio

Regina Bernhaupt is associated researcher at IRIT, France and acts as director of user experience research at ruwido. Main goal of her research work is to understand the eco-system of (TV) entertainment and games and how to design and develop new forms of interaction enabling an enhanced overall user experience. Her work focuses on how to evaluate usability and user experience in various contexts especially for entertainment oriented products and services. She has recently edited a book on Game User Experience Evaluation and is author of several international publications. Regina is currently acting as member of the SIGCHI Executive Committee as VP for Membership and Communication. She has been active member of the Conference Management Committee of SIGCHI. In her role as Chair of the Games and Entertainment Community she helped establish the CHI Play conference and as chair for CHI Courses she implemented a three years experiment to improve coverage of topics for CHI courses offered at the conference and for SIGCHI sponsored conferences. In her spare time Regina loves to take care of her citron and orange trees in her garden in the south of France.

Page 1 of 3

About the SCHI Lab

The SCHI Lab research lies in the area of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), an area in which research on multisensory experiences makes a difference on how we design and interact with technology in the future. The interdisciplinary team explores tactile, gustatory, and olfactory experiences as novel interaction modalities.

Contact

Sussex Computer Human Interaction Lab

Creative Technology Research Group

School of Engineering and Informatics

University of Sussex Chichester, 1

BN1 9QJ Brighton, UK

Phone: +44 (0)1273 877837

Mail: m.obrist [at] sussex.ac.uk

University of Sussex

ERC

© 2017 SCHI Lab. All Rights Reserved. Designed By JoomShaper